Antique furniture sales are on the rise amid inflation and supply chain issues

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As supply chain issues continue to plague many Americans, dozens of people are turning to antiques to furnish their homes.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that inflation hit a 40-year high in March, rising to 8.5% a year. Consumers have shared their concerns in multiple forums about rising gas, food and energy costs.

As with so much else, prices for furniture in stores have risen – but instead of spending more money on new pieces, people are turning to items that were lovingly made decades ago. .

Not only are antiques economical in many cases, but they also lend a unique look to virtually any room.

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In addition, many consumers are increasingly turning to sustainability.

Cinderella White, general manager of Antique Up in Stevens Point, Wis., said the increase in business at her store was due to the current political and financial climate. She said it got people started looking for pieces that they know will last.

This image posted by Kyle Caldwell Photography shows a dresser refinished with paint and wallpaper by Mary Maloney of Bee’s Knees Interior Design in Hopkinton, Mass. Maloney revives old wooden furniture by painting it in cheerful hues; she also often applies patterned papers. (Kyle Caldwell Photography via AP)

Eco-conscious shoppers are opposed to disposable furniture, the Associated Press also reported — so many people are trying to reuse and recycle.

For all of these reasons and more, antique sales are on the rise across the board.

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Lance Thomas, principal designer at Thomas Guy Interiors in Lake Charles, Louisiana, said different regions of the country seem to lean toward certain antique styles.

“For example, in the South, where I’m based, French antiques are the most coveted because of their historically French heritage,” Thomas told the AP.

This image shows a living room by Georgia Zikas, designer in West Hartford, Conn.  Designers say vintage pieces can work well with any style and go well with modern ones.  (Jane Beiles Photography via AP)

This image shows a living room by Georgia Zikas, designer in West Hartford, Conn. Designers say vintage pieces can work well with any style and go well with modern ones. (Jane Beiles Photography via AP)

“Coastal towns like West Palm Beach in Florida and Malibu in California gravitate to vintage and antique Italian contemporary pieces,” he also said.

When buying antiques, Thomas advised others to trust reliable auction sites, but proceed with caution.

As always, buyers should personally inspect the antiques they are interested in and ensure they are getting a good deal.

“There are some really good knockoffs and reproductions out there that would fool even the most experienced buyer,” he said.

Antique buyers can also take advantage of opportunities to purchase items through Facebook Marketplace, Craigslist, and consignment stores.

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As always, buyers should personally inspect the antiques they are interested in and ensure they are getting a good deal.

This combination of two photos shows a disassembled wooden cabinet, left, and the cabinet restored with white paint and brass hardware, featured in the book "Probably this housewarming party: a guide to creating a home you love," by Beau Ciolino and Matt Armato.  (Beau Ciolino via AP)

This combination of two photos shows a disassembled wood cabinet, left, and the cabinet refinished with white paint and brass hardware, featured in the book “Probably This Housewarming: A Guide to Creating a Home You Adore”, by Beau Ciolino and Matt Armato. (Beau Ciolino via AP)

Just like with the house flipping trend, “furniture flipping” is also becoming popular among buyers.

Many people will buy a piece of furniture with the intention of completely changing its appearance. It makes shopping more cost-effective than buying something new, and it’s a fun activity to DIY a new room for the house. And some people sell their refurbished part for profit.

The object, made of oak, was stuck in the back of the previous owner’s garage.

Mary Maloney of Bee’s Knees Interior Design in Hopkinton, Massachusetts, said she still cherishes her first antique purchase, a chest of drawers she bought more than 40 years ago.

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This also seems true for other people. A woman and her husband from New York’s Lower Hudson Valley bought a sofa table many years ago at a garage sale in their town.

The object, made of oak, was stuck in the back of the previous owner’s garage, the woman reported. To this day, decades later, it still looms large in their bedroom.

“We just loved it – and we never planned on buying something like this. But once we spotted it, it captured our hearts and we ended up bringing it home. “

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She said they couldn’t part with it even now and probably wouldn’t anytime soon.

Kelsey Ramirez of FOX Business and the Associated Press contributed to this article.


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